Transhumanismus/Posthumanismus

14. Juni 2010

Brain-controlled cursor doubles as a neural workout

Filed under: Presse — Schlagwörter: — berndvo @ 08:30

Harnessing brain signals to control keyboards, robots or prosthetic devices is an active area of medical research. Now a rare peek at a human brain hooked up to a computer shows that the two can adapt to each other quickly, and possibly to the brain’s benefit.

Researchers at the University of Washington looked at signals on the brain’s surface while using imagined movements to control a cursor. The results, published this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, show that watching a cursor respond to one’s thoughts prompts brain signals to become stronger than those generated in day-to-day life.

„Bodybuilders get muscles that are larger than normal by lifting weights,“ said lead author Kai Miller, a UW doctoral student in physics, neuroscience and medicine. „We get brain activity that’s larger than normal by interacting with brain-computer interfaces. By using these interfaces, patients create super-active populations of brain cells.“

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25. Februar 2010

Enhanced Imagination Drives Brain-Computer Interface

Filed under: Presse — Schlagwörter: — berndvo @ 12:32

POSTED BY: Morgen Peck // Do, Februar 18, 2010

It’s been clear since brain computer interfaces were developed, that customizing these devices would require learning both on the part of the machine and the human. New research in the Proceedings of the the Academy of the Sciences gives evidence that humans quickly adapt to BCIs.

A team of neurologists and computer scientists at the University of Washington recruited epilepsy patients awaiting surgery and recorded their brain activity with electrocorticography (electrodes attached to the surface of the brain) before and after they manipulated a simple BCI. You can find the full article here, to the right of the press release.

First of all, here’s what they did. They recorded during three circumstances: when patients imagined moving their hand, when they actually moved it, and when they moved a computer cursor by manipulating a BCI. The activity during the imagined task mapped roughly onto the recordings from the actual movement, but were less powerful. When the patients hooked up to the BCI, the pattern was again similar, but the signal much stronger than both the other recordings.

The press release pitched this as evidence that BCIs are a „workout“ for the brain. I don’t completely buy this. The brain isn’t a muscle and more activity doesn’t necessarily mean it’s operating at a higher level. What it does indicate (to me), and what I find far more interesting, is that people can quickly change their brain activity to accommodate BCIs. It also shows how important visual feedback is to people who are manipulating these devices. Experiments like this seem like a good way to maximize the level of feedback a user is getting and to test out different ways of delivering it.

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